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How the Apache Community Upgrades Dependencies: An Evolutionary Study by Gabriele Bavota, Gerardo Canfora, Massimiliano Di Penta, Rocco Oliveto, Sebastiano Panichella

pubblicato 3 nov 2014, 06:42 da Gerardo Canfora   [ aggiornato in data 19 feb 2016, 13:19 ]
Software ecosystems consist of multiple software projects, often interrelated by means of dependency relations. When one project undergoes changes, other projects may decide to upgrade their dependency. For example, a project could use a new version of a component from another project because the latter has been enhanced or subject to some bug-fixing activities. In this paper we study the evolution of dependencies between projects in the Java subset of the Apache ecosystem, consisting of 147 projects, for a period of 14 years, resulting in 1,964 releases. Specifically, we investigate (i) how dependencies between projects evolve over time when the ecosystem grows, (ii) what are the product and process factors that can likely trigger dependency upgrades, (iii) how developers discuss the needs and risks of such upgrades, and (iv) what is the likely impact of upgrades on client projects. The study results—qualitatively confirmed by observations made by analyzing the developers’ discussion—indicate that when a new release of a project is issued, it triggers an upgrade when the new release includes major changes (e.g., new features/services) as well as large amount of bug fixes. Instead, developers are reluctant to perform an upgrade when some APIs are removed. The impact of upgrades is generally low, unless it is related to frameworks/libraries used in crosscutting concerns. Results of this study can support the understanding of the of library/component upgrade phenomenon, and provide the basis for a new family of recommenders aimed at supporting developers in the complex (and risky) activity of managing library/component upgrade within their software projects.
Empirical Software Engineering 20(5), pp. 1275-1317, 2015
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Gerardo Canfora,
3 nov 2014, 06:43
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